TERRACE FROM SUNDAY'S WELL ROAD TO THE SHAKEY BRIDGE

STEPPED TERRACE OFF SUNDAY'S WELL ROAD LEADING TO THE SHAKEY BRIDGE

I had made a number of attempts to locate this bridge during previous visits to Cork City and this time I found it by accident when I discovered a stepped laneway which I decided to explore.

Daly's bridge is a pedestrian bridge spanning the River Lee in Cork, Ireland. Known locally as the Shakey Bridge, it joins Sunday's Well on the north-side, to Fitzgerald's Park in the Mardyke area on the south.

Completed in 1926 and opened in 1927, it is the only suspension bridge in Cork city and was constructed by the London-based David Rowell & Company to the design of Stephen W. Farrington, the Cork City Engineer.

Constructed primarily from wrought iron, the bridge spans 160 feet, and the timber planked walkway is four and a half feet wide.

The bridge takes its official name from Cork businessman James Daly, who contributed to the cost of the bridge. Its colloquial name (the "Shakey Bridge" or "Shaky Bridge") derives from the movement of the platform when running or jumping on the bridge.

As I was rather disappointed by the condition of the bridge I carried our an investigation upon my return home and discovered that the City Council are planning to restore and repair the structure which suffered from extensive corrosion and damage over many years. My understanding is that the restoration work is now ongoing.

Conservation works on the main steel structure will include removing and replacing timber decking, phased dismantling of the latticed deck for repair before being placed back, and graffiti removal.

Dismantling the bridge for repair off-site is considered best practice and has been undertaken successfully on a number of similar bridge schemes across Europe as was the case with the Halfpenny Bridge in Dublin. Therefore, the bridge will be unavailable to to public for a number of months
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