THE MAGIC DOOR BY STEVE DOODY - SCULPTURE IN CONTEXT IN CONTEXT 2017

THE MAGIC DOOR BY STEVE DOODY

I noticed that this appealed to young children and some older people. As I was never a Bosco fan I did not realise [until my sister mentioned it] that this door was of major significance to many people.

Bosco is a children's television programme produced during the late 1970s and 1980s. It was produced and shown by RTÉ in Ireland. Designed by Jan Mitchell, Bosco was voiced by Jonathan Ryan initially, in the pilot series that was broadcast, with four presenters per show, in 1979. When the show went into full-time production in 1980, with two presenters per show, Miriam Lambert took over. From the 1981 season onwards, Paula Lambert took over.

A shared cultural experience for children in Ireland at the time, it ran for 386 episodes, ending production in 1987. The show, however, was continually repeated before (and later during) The Den daily until 30 September 1996, when it was replaced by The Morbegs before officially ending on 1 May 1998.

The show was presented by Bosco, a small red-haired puppet, Bosco and the other presenters usually spoke English, but to help young children learn Irish Bosco often peppered English speech with Irish phrases. Bosco lived in a brightly painted wooden box (hence the name, the Irish for "box" is "bosca"), only ever wandering far from it to go on excursions to such places as Dublin Zoo or the HB Ice Cream factory. The show also had a number of other segments.

Each episode had an on-location section of footage, this was introduced as "The Magic Door". The presenter would step through a chroma keyed door beyond which the footage would be shown.

There are various short animations, usually stop-motion, as part of the show. The Plonsters were plasticine critters, which are continually engaged in fights or schemes against each other. Faherty's Garden, created by David Byrne, starred the eponymous Faherty a dog, plagued by an amateur crow magician (Cornelius, who would often turn purple, much to his distress) in a series of shorts featuring stop-motion models. Freddy the Fox features a host of well-modelled characters each with distinctive traits, such as Fiachra the Frog, Gregory Grainog and Sile Seilide . There was also a cartoon featuring a potato family, The McSpuds, that live in a supermarket (Savers) owned by Mr McGinty. At night, the potato children, Sheila and Seamus, run amok. The Tongue Twister Twins were also regularly featured. These animations were created by Jim Quin from Thurles, County Tipperary.
  •  BY STEVE DOODY 001

    BY STEVE DOODY 001

  •  BY PETER BIELENBERG 002

    BY PETER BIELENBERG 002

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