TEMPLE BAR AREADUBLIN CITY CENTRE


Back in 1966 when I was sixteen I had a part-time job with the International Trading Group [ITG]. ITG was based in Temple Bar and they imported top end Hi-Fi equipment (Sony, Teac, Sansui,Revox,Scott, etc.) . I started out as a trainee service engineer [I was studying electronics and telecommunications at Kevin Street College]. One weekend they had no sales staff or managers, due to flu, and I had to deal with customers on my own without any supervision and it went very well. On the following weekend when I arrived for work the owner told me that I had been transferred to sales with a huge increase in pay and I was not in a position to refuse. Years later I established my own audio import business and later joined Memorex in the USA. The big advantage of working for ITG was that certain staff members were allowed to have their own clients ... we were allowed to buy wholesale and set our own retail prices.

Temple Bar (Irish: Barra an Teampaill) is an area on the south bank of the River Liffey in central Dublin, Ireland. The area is bounded by the Liffey to the north, Dame Street to the south, Westmoreland Street to the east and Fishamble Street to the west. It is promoted as Dublin's 'cultural quarter' and, as a centre of Dublin's city centre's nightlife, is a tourist destination.

Temple Bar is in the Dublin 2 postcode.

The area is the location of a number of cultural institutions, including the Irish Photography Centre (incorporating the Dublin Institute of Photography, the National Photographic Archive and the Gallery of Photography), the Ark Children's Cultural Centre, the Irish Film Institute, incorporating the Irish Film Archive, the Button Factory, the Arthouse Multimedia Centre, Temple Bar Gallery and Studios, the Project Arts Centre, the Gaiety School of Acting, IBAT College Dublin, the New Theatre, as well as the Irish Stock Exchange.

At night the area is a centre for nightlife, with various tourist-focused nightclubs, restaurants and bars. Pubs in the area include The Temple Bar pub, The Porterhouse, The Oliver St. John Gogarty, The Turk's Head, The Quays Bar, The Foggy Dew, The Auld Dubliner, The Stag's Head, Bad Bobs and Busker's Bar.

The area has two renovated squares – Meetinghouse Square and the central Temple Bar Square. The Temple Bar Book Market is held on Saturdays and Sundays in Temple Bar Square. Meetinghouse Square, which takes its name from the nearby Quaker Meeting House, is used for outdoor film-screenings in the summer months.[17] Since summer 2004, Meetinghouse Square is also home to the 'Speaker's Square' project (an area of public speaking) and to the 'Temple Bar Food Market' on Saturdays.

The 'Cow's Lane Market' is a fashion and design market which takes place on Cow's Lane on Saturdays.[18]

Part of the 13th century Augustinian Friary of the Holy Trinity is visible within an apartment/restaurant complex called 'The Friary'.

Because of Covid-19 the area may have changed and many of the companies and restaurants may have ceased trading.


EAST ESSEX STREETTEMPLE BAR AREA OF DUBLIN

Essex Street dates from 1674 and is named after Arthur Capel the Earl of Essex and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland at the time.


CROW STREETTEMPLE BAR AREA OF DUBLIN

Crow Street was named after William Crowe who held land in the area in the early seventeenth century and built a house called the 'Crowes Nest'. The street it was laid out in 1731 on land which is shown as undeveloped on Charles Brooking's map of Dublin dating to 1728.


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