ARTANE | DUBLIN STREET IMAGES

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ARTANE

Artane is a Northside suburb of Dublin, Ireland. Neighbouring districts include Coolock, Beaumont, Killester, Raheny and Clontarf; to the south is a small locality, Harmonstown, straddling the Raheny-Artane border.

The district today has a dispersed character, lying either side of the Malahide Road, with focal points around the churches, main shopping centre and Artane Roundabout. There are shopping areas on Malahide Road, and opposite St John Vianney Roman Catholic church, there is a shopping centre, Artane Castle Shopping Centre (anchored by Tesco Ireland).

There are two Roman Catholic churches, a considerable distance apart – Our Lady of Mercy, Brookwood Grove, and St John Vianney, Ardlea Road. It is also the site of the large Coolock-Artane Credit Union main office (the other, older office is in Northside Shopping Centre), and the smaller Donnycarney-Beaumont Credit Union, located in Artane Castle Shopping Centre.

Schools in Artane include St. David's CBS and St. David's Boys National schools, mentioned above, and St. John of God National School on Kilmore Road.

In 1534, when Silken Thomas appeared in Dublin, the citizens, feeling themselves unable to defend the city, allowed his troops to enter and lay siege to Dublin Castle. Among those who had taken refuge in the Castle was John Alen, Archbishop of Dublin. He had incurred the enmity of the FitzGeralds (also known as the Geraldines) by zeal in promoting Wolsey's plans, and now dreaded their vengeance. He tried to escape by sea, but his ship was driven ashore at Clontarf. He sought refuge at Artane Castle, the home of his friend and fellow councillor Thomas St. Lawrence: St. Lawrence willingly took him in, but his hiding place was betrayed and he was captured. When brought before Silken Thomas, he implored the Earl to spare his life, but the young lord turned away with contempt, saying "Beir uaim an bodach" ("take the fellow away"). These words were interpreted as an order to put him to death and he was murdered in cold blood.

For this crime, Silken Thomas was excommunicated by the Pope and thus lost many of his adherents. A slab bearing his name is still to be seen in the Archbishop's cemetery. In this old cemetery, we also have the 18th century tomb of Richard Hollywood of Elm Park and the ruins of the 13th century parish church.