2017 MEMORIAL TO THE SS ADELA

2017 MEMORIAL TO THE SS ADELA

I did not remember seeing this before but I later discovered that I had photographed it early in 2018.

On the Saturday (30th September) two plaques will be unveiled at Sean O’ Casey Bridge to commemorate the centenary of the loss of the Dublin Port ships SS Hare and SS Adela.

In December 1917, two merchant ships, the SS Hare and the SS Adela, were torpedoed by German U-boats and were lost in the Irish sea during the First World War. Thirty six lives were lost on 14 December and 27 December 1917, which had a huge impact on the Dublin Docklands community, where many of these victims resided and worked.

Several crew members survived. One hundred years later the Docklands communities with the support of Dublin City Council, Dublin Port Company and others took the initiative to remember and commemorate these two ships and all who sailed with them on their final journeys.

Saturday 30 September 2017 at Custom House Quay near the Sean O’Casey Bridge (North Side) and opposite ‘The CHQ Building’ memorial plaque was unveiled to the SS Hare and a second commemorative plaque was unveiled to the SS Adela at the Campshire Buildings close to the Ship’s original berth on Sir John Rogerson’s Quay.

On 27 September 1913, the S.S Hare arrived in Dublin from Salford, loaded with food and supplies intended to assist the families of those locked-out by William Martin Murphy and other Dublin employers.

The Adela was a cargo ship, a 3 masted iron steamer owned by R Tedcastle & co. Dublin. The crew except for 2 were Merchant seamen. On the 27th of Dec 1917 the defensively armed Adela was 12 NW of Skerries when without warning she was torpedoed and sunk by U-boat 100. 24 lives lost.

SM U-100 was one of the 329 submarines serving in the Imperial German Navy in World War I. U-100 was engaged in the German campaign against Allied commerce (Handelskrieg) during that conflict. SM U-100, a Type U 57 submarine launched in 1917 surrendered on 27 November 1918 and was broken up at Swansea in 1922.
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