WOLFE TONE STREET IS BEING RESURFACED

WOLFE TONE STREET IS BEING RESURFACED

WOLFE TONE STREET IS BEING RESURFACED

The ongoing works include realignment of Wolfe Tone Street to improve pedestrian facilities and upgrade works on Wolfe Tone Park.

According to Dublin City Council the Wolfe Tone Park & Street Environmental Improvement Scheme offers a new destination point for all, as an ever-changing civic space where daily life and spectacle collide. The contextual design offers a thriving and inviting multi-use urban space for all ages and abilities, to be treasured by residents, workers and visitors. The design consists of two phases:

Phase one, the redesign and refurbishment of Wolfe Tone Street to create a more pedestrian friendly environment with new public lighting and street furniture and the use of a historic materials palette, creating both a high quality environment and character area.

Phase two involves the refurbishment of Wolfe Tone Park, everything within the park has been designed with intent: from the proposed new feature lawn, the retention of the existing mature trees, the proposed horticulture, to conservation and recognition of the parks history as a graveyard.

Wolfe Tone Park, sometimes known as Wolfe Tone Square, is a public space in Dublin, Ireland. Named for Theobald Wolfe Tone (1763–1798), the park is the site of a graveyard that was attached to St. Mary's Church. The graveyard was deconsecrated in 1966 and laid out as a green park. In 1998, Dublin City Council held an international competition to redesign the park, which was won by Peter Cody of Boyd Cody Architects. The park in its current form was completed in 2001.

The park is the final resting place of the United Irishman Archibald Hamilton Rowan (1751–1834), Mary Mercer, founder of Mercer's Hospital (died 1734), the philosopher Francis Hutcheson (1694–1746), Sir Boyle Roche, 1st Baronet (1736–1807), an Irish politician and member of the Irish House of Commons, parish rector William Fletcher (1715–1771), and Lord Norbury (1745–1831; known colloquially as the hanging judge).

Since the park layout was changed, the park had been made available by Dublin City Council for events - such as the Dublin Fringe Festival. However, following a campaign from local residents to restore "Wolfe Tone Park as a non-commercial green space", as of 2015, there has been debate in the Council as to the future use of the park.

The Wolfe Tone Park Community is committed to campaigning for the restoration of Wolfe Tone Park (Square) and surrounding streets for the benefit of local residents and visitors to the area: "Residents living around Wolfe Tone Park have witnessed the demise of the area through neglect and mismanagement by Dublin City Council and event organisers. In particular, the redevelopment of the space in 2001 that retained only some of the original lawn area. The remaining lawn was removed after a month-long event in 2006."

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