I am working my way through my catalogue of photographs and in many cases repairing or reprocessing them. This series of images date from 30 April 2016.


The Old Church of St. George, commonly called "Little George's" in Hill Street (formerly Temple Street Lower) Parish of St. Mary, Dublin was built in 1668 by the Eccles family for their workmen and also as a chapel-of-ease to a nearby St. Mary's Church. However, that St. Mary's Church was not St. Mary's Church, Dublin as that church’s foundation stone was laid in 1700, and it was not St. Mary's Abbey, Dublin as that was dissolved in 1539. Therefore St George's church, Hill Street, may have been a Chapel-of-Ease to St. Michan's Church in Church Street. The main body of the church, with the exception of the tower, was demolished in 1894.


Following the decision to build a new chapel the congregation moved to a temporary chapel on Whitworth Road 1793 before the new St. George's Church, Dublin was built on Hardwick Place, (Upper) Temple Street. The Old St. George, St. George's Chapel, sometimes called Little St. Georges was used as an Episcopal Chapel for a time.


The tower of the church is now classed as a "Protected Structure".[ The entrance was below an old square steeple or tower, about 40 feet in height. The interior of the tower is small and was adorned with a few monuments. The communion-table was in a recess at the eastern end lit by a large circular-headed window, with a monument to the memory of Lady Galbraith on its south side. In the west over the entrance was a small, badly lit gallery.

CHURCH TOWER ON HILL STREET 001
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CHURCH TOWER ON HILL STREET 003
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CHURCH TOWER ON HILL STREET 006
CHURCH TOWER ON HILL STREET 007

22/04/2016

MUINTIR NA CATHRACH BY KATIE LYONS 


This example of Paint-A-Box street art was located on Rathmines Road between 2015 and 2017 and  I photographed in in April 2016.


Artwork description: Sometimes it's easy to go about your day without really seeing life around us. This piece celebrates the faces that surround us daily and create our city's unique character. (Translated to English, the title reads "City Dwellers" / "The People of the City".




MUINTIR NA CATHRACH BY KATIE LYONS   001
MUINTIR NA CATHRACH BY KATIE LYONS   002
MUINTIR NA CATHRACH BY KATIE LYONS   003

This street art by Anna Doran was located [2015 - 2017] on Rathmines Road.


As described by the artist: New York artist Stephen Powers aka ESPO has always been a great inspiration to me and to many street artists. My 'Hold me Close' traffic light box is a take on his famous works. I wanted to give the traffic light box some attention and a Stephen Power's hug. I hope it reminds passers by how powerful and healing a hug can be and how they can erase and heal worries.

Hold Me Close By Anna Doran
Paint-A-Box Street Art In Rathmines

I lived close to one of the entrances to this church and did not know that it is  St Paul Of The Cross Church as everyone that I know referred to it as Mount Argus.


This series of photographs date from 2016 and there has been a lot of [re]development activity since then. Early in 2019 the Marlet Property Group  sold the monastery building for much more than the €3.5 million guide price. There was  planning permission in place to convert the 19th century monastery into 32 duplexes and apartments.


Mount Argus was the official home of Saint Charles of Mount Argus who was a well known Passionist priest in 19th-century Ireland, mentioned as a miracle worker in the book Ulysses, Circe chapter. It also has long-established links with the Garda Síochána and it was officially the church of the Dublin Metropolitan Police. The first Rector of Mount Argus was Fr. Paul Mary Pakenham who was the son of the Earl of Longford and nephew of Kitty Pakenham (Duchess of Wellington). His first mass took place in a house at the time on 15 August 1856. Irish architect J.J. McCarthy was commissioned to design the new monastery.

MOUNT ARGUS CHURCH AND MONASTERY 001
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My Grandparents on my father's side of the family are buried here as are are some other members of the extended family. When I returned to Dublin  from the USA in the 1980s I lived beside the cemetery for an extended period and unfortunately the cemetery was in very condition and was being vandalised on a daily basis. In 1998 the cemetery was acquired by Masseys and they undertook major  renovation programme which has produced excellent results. In 2000 they reported that  about 4,000 new and unused plots have been identified and according to manager of Mount Jerome, Alan Massey, it represented up to 20 years supply.


Mount Jerome Cemetery & Crematorium is situated in Harold's Cross on the south side of Dublin, Ireland.  Since its foundation in 1836, it has witnessed over 300,000 burials. Originally an exclusively Protestant cemetery, Roman Catholics have also been buried there since the 1920s.


The name of the cemetery comes from an estate established there by the Reverend Stephen Jerome, who in 1639 was vicar of St. Kevin's Parish. At that time, Harold's Cross was part of St. Kevin's Parish. In the latter half of the 17th century, the land passed into the ownership of the Earl of Meath, who in turn leased plots to prominent Dublin families. A house, Mount Jerome House, was constructed in one of these plots, and leased to John Keogh. In 1834, after an aborted attempt to set up a cemetery in the Phoenix Park, the General Cemetery Company of Dublin bought the Mount Jerome property, "for establishing a general cemetery in the neighbourhood of the city of Dublin".


The first official burial happened on the 19th of September 1836. The buried deceased were the infant twins of Matthew Pollock.


The cemetery initially started with a landmass of 26 acres and grew to a size of 48 acres in 1874.


In 1984, burial numbers were falling, thus the Cemetery was losing revenue and began to deteriorate. A crematorium was needed to regain revenue and deal with plant overgrowth on the estate.


The Funerary Chapel in the cemetery was the first Puginian Gothic church in Dublin. It was designed by William Atkins.


In 2000, Mount Jerome Cemetery established its own crematorium on the site. Recently I attended a number of humanist funerals at MountJerome and I must admit that I was impressed by the services and the overall process.


A humanist funeral is a ceremony that celebrates the life of someone who's died, without mentioning religion or a god. Humanist funeral services are usually led by a celebrant, who guides guests through the readings and music much like a priest/vicar would in a Christian service.



2016 VISIT TO MOUNT JEROME CEMETERY 001
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2016 VISIT TO MOUNT JEROME CEMETERY 003
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2016 VISIT TO MOUNT JEROME CEMETERY 021

21/04/2016

This series of images dates from 21 April 2016 and I have visited a number of times since then.



Swords Castle was built as the manorial residence of the Archbishops of Dublin around 1200 or a little later in Swords, just north of Dublin. I visited a number of times since but because of Covid-19 restrictions I could not gain access to view the results of a recent restoration programme. I hope to visit again within a few weeks.


It was never strong in the military sense, but covers a large pentagonal walled area of nearly 1.5 acres (6,000 m²) with a tower on the north, probably the Constable's residence, and an impressive gateway complex on the south. The warder may have occupied the quarters to the left of the gate, while to the right was the janitor's room with the priest's room overhead. The adjoining chapel, built in the late thirteenth century, was probably used as the Archbishop's private oratory.


Other buildings, recorded for an inquisition in 1326, have now vanished, including the great hall on the east side of the enclosure. The Archbishop abandoned Swords once a new palace was built at Tallaght in 1324 - a move no doubt encouraged by damage sustained during Bruce's campaign of 1317. The stepped battlements suggest some form of occupancy during the fifteenth century, but by 1583, when briefly occupied by Dutch Protestants, it was described as "the quite spoiled old castle". It was used as a garden in the nineteenth century and sold after the Church of Ireland was disestablished.


The newly renovated castle was used as a film location for the production of TV series The Tudors in spring 2010.


Since 2013 a multi-disciplinary team of conservation engineers, archaeologists and architects have been carrying out conservation works under National Monument Ministerial Consent 450.


One of the major conservations challenges was the consolidation of the East Tower. The overall stability of the ruins was a matter of concern considering the pronounced lean on the tower, extensive cracking, and surface erosion of the Dublin calp limestone. Following the removal of vegetation temporary propping was installed. The permanent solution was developed and implemented in the most recent works phase.


The unique design solution the team devised combined modern methods alongside traditional to conserved as much of the medieval fabric as possible. An honestly-expressed, functional concrete plate ties the three remaining walls together and a traditional lime-based shelter coat protects the vulnerable masonry. The visual impact is striking, clearly differentiating the new insertion from the original as well as being respectful of the historic setting.


At the Engineers Ireland Excellence Awards 2019, The Architects Department received the Heritage and Conservation award for this innovative work on the Castle.

The parish of St Colmcille’s Swords, has an interesting history extending right back to the 6th century. It was St Colmcille who brought Christianity to the area circa 560 AD. 

The current Church building on Church Road was constructed in 1827 at a cost of £ 1,820.


The  Round Tower dates from the 9th century and marks the site of an old monastery founded by St. Colmcille in the year 560 A.D. St. Colmcille blessed the local well of clear water, thus giving the town it's name 'Sord' meaning clear or pure. The Tower is reputed to have held the remains of Brian Boru after the battle of Clontarf (1014 A.D.) before he was taken to Armagh to be buried.The tower is 73 feet high, 52 feet in circumference, with walls four feet thick. It originally contained five floors. The current entrance at ground level, is of more modern construction, as well as the roof and upper story. The original doorway is/was twenty feet from the ground, and but four feet high. The cross at the top of the tower was placed there in the late 17th century to let people know that it was a Christian Tower [as if they would be unaware].


The square clock tower  dates back to the 14th century and added to the ancient abbey. There's an engraving which dates from 1791 which shows the belfry tower and the remains of the medieval church walls. These walls were taken down in 1830 when St. Columba's Church was being rebuilt.


St. Columba's Church Lodge was build in 1870 costing £140.


Back in 2016 when I took these photographs I was told, by a local visiting the graveyard, that although previously in good condition the church building required repairs. There were signs of increasing conservation problems. There was no immediate danger of collapse but condition is such that unless urgent remedial works were carried out the building would quickly deteriorate. The community had vacated the structure following loose plaster which fell into area over font. Complex remedial works was required required. 


Now in July 2022 I am unaware of the status of the building but to the best of my knowledge the church is now operational on Sundays. I hope to visit Swords again within the next few weeks.


I am a bit worried that this well will not survive.


About sixty or fifty years ago my father suggested that there were at least 3,000 holy wells in Ireland and he claims to have seen most of them. I should mention that because of his job my father had visited almost every town and village in Ireland and during the summer holidays he would bring us along with him and I should mention that my youngest brother was a world class "are we there yet" expert. My brother is still the same. It should be noted that, according to my father, we had holy wells and in the US they had alien abductions and Area 51 but at the time we had no idea as to what he meant and, to be honest, we did not care as many of the places we visited were less than interesting.


St. Colmcille is said to have founded the Holy Well on the Well Road in Swords. Legend has it that he took a Giant Step from the Round Tower and landed at the spot to where the Well is. 


It had many uses for the people of Swords before the steel door was closed and a gate leading to the steps were placed there many years ago.  It was said that the water was holy so people took small amounts home to bless their houses. Another use was when the water pumps ran dry during the summer months the local people  went to the well with their buckets and brought the water home. As with most wells the water was chrystal clear and ice cold to drink.

HOLY WELL ON WELL ROAD IN SWORDS 001
HOLY WELL ON WELL ROAD IN SWORDS 002
HOLY WELL ON WELL ROAD IN SWORDS 003
HOLY WELL ON WELL ROAD IN SWORDS 004

This work is long gone. It was beside the Phone Kiosk , which has been replaced, and the Dublinbikes docking station on Bolton Street. To the best of my knowledge the artwork was on display from 2025 to 2017.


Dublin Canvas is an inclusive public art project. To date, they have had a collection of artists from all age groups - students to retirees, from all walks of life - barristers to baristas, a mixture of nationalities and a variety of art disciplines. Graphic designers, illustrators, stencil artists street artists and landscape artists to name but a few. 


Artist: Bridget Ni Dhuinn Belcher

Description: "Being originally from the countryside foxes have always been a common sight for me. When I first moved to Dublin I couldn't get over the number of foxes everywhere. I was so used to seeing them in the fields and amongst nature that I couldn't get used to their appearance roaming through the streets of Dublin. At first, it made me sad to see such a beautiful animal away from its natural habitat but at the same time isn't it fascinating to see an animal adapt and evolve to suit a whole new type of environment? As a result, I have dedicated my design to the City Foxes. In hope that people may appreciate the beautiful animal that shares Dublin City with us."

PAINT-A-BOX STREET ART ON BOLTON STREET 001
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